Weight status of adolescents and young adults
weight status of adolescents and young adults R Hakeem 11.01.2000
no title Tim Cole 11.01.2000


Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 10:52:44 +0500

From: hakeem <hakeematcyberaccess.com.pk>

Subject: weight status of adolescents and young adults

 

I 'll be grateful if anyone could suggest the most appropriate criterion for categorising 10-23 year old Pakistani males and females into unerweight, normal wieght and overweight subjects. I have height weight age, waist and hip values for these subjects.

Is is appropriate to use WHO values for estimating CED and overweight for more than 18-23 year olds. I have doubts because if we use above 85th percentile values from BMI curves for UKadults a larger proportion of subjects would be categoirsed as overweight as compared to using WHO values.

I'll be thankfult for expert's advice.

 

Dr R Hakeem

Dept. of Nutr., RLAK G. College of Home Ecs Stadium Rd Karachi 74800, Pakistan


From: Tim Cole Tim.Coleatich.ucl.ac.uk

Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2000 16:55:57 GMT

 

This is a difficult problem, not least because it covers the transition from child to adult. I have a paper in press with the BMJ which provides BMI cut-offs for overweight and obesity for children from 2 up to 18 years.

The cut-offs are based on pooled data from six large nationally representative surveys, and are defined to pass through BMI 25 and 30 kg/m2 respectively at age 18. The same BMI cut-offs of 25 and 30 can be used for adults over 18 years. I give the values below. Unfortunately this does not solve the problem of defining underweight in this age group.

Tim Cole

 

The reference will be: Cole TJ, Bellizzi MC, Flegal KM, Dietz WH. Body mass index in children worldwide: cut-off points for overweight and obesity. BMJ 2000;(in press).

 

Age

BMI 25

BMI 30

(years)

Boys

Girls

Boys

Girls

2

18.41

18.02

20.09

19.81

2.5

18.13

17.76

19.80

19.55

3

17.89

17.56

19.57

19.36

3.5

17.69

17.40

19.39

19.23

4

17.55

17.28

19.29

19.15

4.5

17.47

17.19

19.26

19.12

5

17.42

17.15

19.30

19.17

5.5

17.45

17.20

19.47

19.34

6

17.55

17.34

19.78

19.65

6.5

17.71

17.53

20.23

20.08

7

17.92

17.75

20.63

20.51

7.5

18.16

18.03

21.09

21.01

8

18.44

18.35

21.60

21.57

8.5

18.76

18.69

22.17

22.18

9

19.10

19.07

22.77

22.81

9.5

19.46

19.45

23.39

23.46

10

19.84

19.86

24.00

24.11

10.5

20.20

20.29

24.57

24.77

11

20.55

20.74

25.10

25.42

11.5

20.89

21.20

25.58

26.05

12

21.22

21.68

26.02

26.67

12.5

21.56

22.14

26.43

27.24

13

21.91

22.58

26.84

27.76

13.5

22.27

22.98

27.25

28.20

14

22.62

23.34

27.63

28.57

14.5

22.96

23.66

27.98

28.87

15

23.29

23.94

28.30

29.11

15.5

23.60

24.17

28.60

29.29

16

23.90

24.37

28.88

29.43

16.5

24.19

24.54

29.14

29.56

17

24.46

24.70

29.41

29.69

17.5

24.73

24.85

29.70

29.84

18

25

25

30

30

 

Tim Cole

Epidemiology & Public Health, Institute of Child Health, London WC1N 1EH, UK

Phone +44(0)20 7905 2666 Fax +44(0)20 7242 2723

Tim.Coleatich.ucl.ac.uk