Failing Breast Feeding
Failing Breast Feeding David Morley 06.01.2000
Re: Failing Breast Feeding Ali Maclaine 07.01.2000
Signs of failing BF David Morley 07.01.2000


Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2000 15:00:44 +0000

From: David Morley <Davidatmorleydc.demon.co.uk>

Subject: Failing Breast Feeding

 

Dear Friends, One further observation suggesting breast milk supply is inadequate from the Imesi Longitudinal study of infant growing up. Where infants sleep with the mothers nipple in their mouth the complaint by mothers that the child cries at night suggest supply may be getting inadequate. David.

 

David Morley,Emeritus Professor of Tropical Child Health, University of London.

Davidatmorleydc.demon.co.uk

Tel: & Fax. 44 (0) 1582 712199.

Preferred Address; 51 Eastmoor Park, Harpenden, AL5 1BN. UK.


Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2000 11:25:17 +0000

From: Maclainesataol.com

Subject: Re: Failing Breast Feeding

 

Dear David,

I've been away and just picked up your rather confusing e-mail. What is the longitudinal study you are talking about? Has there been other correspondence about this which I have missed and that I might catch up on.

Certainly from my experience as a lactation specialist I have never come across the suggestion that there is a lack of milk due to the child sleeping with the nipple in their mouth. If anything stimulation of the nipple will increase milk production as will night feeds. As for the child crying at night there could be a lot of reasons for this - wet nappies, too hot, too cold, being woken by noise etc etc. I would like to find out about this study before I comment further but it does all seem rather peculiar.

Regards,

 

Ali Maclaine.


Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2000 13:38:57 +0000

From: David Morley <Davidatmorleydc.demon.co.uk>

Subject: Signs of failing BF

 

Dear Ali Maclaine, Sorry my message was confusing. It was in reply to a list from I think WHO of SIGNS of failing breast milk supply (see ? : UNICEF statement on the duration of exclusive breastfeeding ; note from PFEDA). I too am all in favour of and marvel at continuous breast feeding through the night which is almost universal in W.Africa. I am sure that most of those who have experience in Africa notice that infants very rarely cry as if they are frightened, hurt, or are unsure they are immediately offered the mother's nipple. This is why I was surprised when mothers said they cried at night and from their weight chart concluded that this was due to an inadequate breast milk supply--but this was only a chance observation and I made no detailed scientific study. Hope this clears this up. David

 

David Morley,Emeritus Professor of Tropical Child Health, University of London.

Davidatmorleydc.demon.co.uk

Tel: & Fax. 44 (0) 1582 712199.

Preferred Address; 51 Eastmoor Park, Harpenden, AL5 1BN. UK.