Adoption of Malnourished Children
Research on Success of Therapy in Reversing the Effects of Childhood Malnutrition? Buford Nichols 22.11.99
Re: Research on Success of Therapy in Reversing the Effects of Childhood Malnutrition? Ted Greiner 23.11.99
Re: Adoption of Malnourished Children David Brewster 29.11.99


Date: Mon, 22 Nov 1999 17:04:55 -0600

From: "Buford Nichols, M.D." <bnicholsatbcm.tmc.edu>

Subject: Research on Success of Therapy in Reversing the Effects of Childhood Malnutrition?

 

Mike,

This looks like a good question to be submitted to the NGONUT bulletin board for discussion.

Buford

 

>Date: Mon, 22 Nov 1999 13:05:50 -0600

>From: Annette Thompson <annetteatprecious.org>

>Subject: Research on Success of Therapy in Reversing the Effects of Childhood Malnutrition?

 

>Hi,

>My name is Annette Thompson and I administer the Precious in HIS Sight Internet Adoption Photolisting at http://precious.org. I get a lot of questions about the long term effects of childhood malnutrition from prospective adoptive parents considering adoption from third world countries. Do you happen to know of any research or experts who may know about research on the success of therapy to reverse the effects of childhood malnutirtion? I'd like to give parents some encouragement that babies who are malnourished when they come to an orphanage at about 6 months can recover with good nutritional and medical care and love. Many parents worry that if their child was malnourished as an infant, that he or she is doomed to intellectual mediocity.

>Thanks so much for your help.


Date: Tue, 23 Nov 1999 10:25:41 +0200

From: Ted Greiner <Ted.GreineratICH.uu.se>

Subject: Re: Research on Success of Therapy in Reversing the Effects of Childhood Malnutrition?

 

You may be interested in a PhD Thesis (which consisted of five published papers) by Dr. Lemm Proos: Growth and Development of Indian Children Adopted in Sweden, Uppsala University, 1992. These children were typical for underprivileged children in India upon arrival in Sweden. Catch up growth was good and psychomotor retardation disappeared fairly soon in most children. There was a problem of early debut of menarche for some, especially girls who were a few years old upon arrival. This resulted in early cessation of growth and low attainted height. I believe that those who work in this field are now aware of this and treat such girls so as to reduce this problem.

 

Sincerely,

Ted Greiner


From: David.BrewsteratCASMOBLE.HEALTH.nt.gov.au

Subject: Re: Adoption of Malnourished Children

Date: Mon, 29 Nov 1999 10:27:23 +0930

 

Dear NGONUTs

Since I have seen no other responses, I would like to refer this issue to the paper by Lien, Meyer and Winick in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition vol 30 October 1977 pp1734-39. This is the well-known Korean Orphan Study. Myron Winick has also written a review in Science on the subject.

This study followed a cohort of 240 female Korean orphans adopted into American families after the age of 2 years. My reading of the results is that they show a remarkable (although perhaps incomplete) capacity for catch up in growth and IQ, which rarely occurs without such a radical change of environment. I think it could be interpreted in a very favourable way for the purposes of Annette Thomson's query. However, the work of Dobbing et. al. does mean that the timing, duration and severity of the initial nutritional insult also need to be considered. Nevertheless, neonatal asphyxia or severe meningitis would be of greater concern than malnutrition as a risk factor for cerebral palsy.

Sincerely

 

David Brewster

Northern Territory Clinical School, Darwin, Australia