Milk : storage and freezing
Freezing milk Mona Shaikh 26.10.98
Freezing milk Juana Willumsen 27.10.98
Freezing milk Hanaa Ismail 27.10.98
Re: Freezing milk John Sherbon 27.10.98
Storage of breast milk samples Joan Hildebrand 26.10.98
Re: Storage of breast milk samples Helene Delisle 27.10.98
Breast milk storage Ghermai Berhe 09.12.98


From: "Mona Shaikh" <Mona.Shaikhatwfp.org>

Date: Mon, 26 Oct 1998 17:00:24 +0500

Subject: Ngonut: Freezing milk

 

I have come across people in the community here who freeze milk as a means of storing excess supplies. After defrosting and boiling, it seems fine but i am not sure if it is an appropriate preservation method for milk.

Grateful for comments.


Date: Tue, 27 Oct 1998 15:47:42 +0000

From: "Juana Willumsen" <willumsenjatMED.UND.AC.ZA>

Subject: Ngonut: Freezing milk

 

Are we talking about breastmilk or other? Certainly the recommended ways of storing breastmilk are at 4 degrees c if it is to be used within 24 hours, or frozen for longer term storage. In order to maintain the immunological quality of the breastmilk it is advisable to store in plastic, as the cells won't stick. Pasteurising is reccommended if expressed breastmilk from a woman is to be used for an infant other than her own. Frozen breastmilk kept at -20 degrees should be OK for up to 3 months.

If you are interested in setting up a Breastmilk Bank, further information is available from Breastmilk Bank News in the UK - I don't have the address with me right now, but can pass it on if anyone is interested.

 

Juana Willumsen

Centre for International Child Health, Institute of Child Health, London

and Dept Paediatrics and Child Health

University of Natal Medical School, Durban


From: "Dr. Hanaa Ismail" ismailattecmina.com

Subject: Re: Ngonut: Freezing milk

 

As for the freezing of milk,nothing will happen to the chemical or nutritious value of milk as a result of freezing,however it is advisable for the milk to be pasteurized prior to freezing .Even freezing conditions aremaintained also the milk will be microbiologically sound On the other hand why opt for this method of milk preservation.Why not store milk as powder or as condensed milk?

 

Dr Hanaa Ismail

Professor -HOD Nutrition Department

Alexandria University


Date: Tue, 27 Oct 1998 09:47:22 +0000

From: John Sherbon <jws7atcornell.edu>

Subject: Re: Freezing milk

 

In response to the question on freezing milk:

There would be little nutritional change in the milk. Home freezing usually results in slight destabilization (dewatering) of the casein, thus the thawed milk tends to take on a slightly curdled appearance. Rapid freezing and thawing, along with limited time in storage, will avoid this.

The medical doctors on this list can confirm that this is a common way for working mothers to preserve their milk for their infants.

I should also point out that freezing is the most expensive way of preserving milk for later use.

John W Sherbon, Professor emeritus

Cornell University


Date: Thu, 26 Nov 1998 16:51:38 +0000

From: "Joan Hildebrand" <Joan_HildebrandatWorldvision.CA>

Subject: Ngonut: Storage of breast milk samples

 

Greetings - wondering what the maximum suggested time is for storage (at -80) of:

1. breast milk samples for analysis of vitamin A

2. serum samples for analysis of serum retinol

Thanks...

 

Joan Hildebrand, MSc, R.D., Nutrition Officer

World Vision Canada

(905) 821-3033 X3781

joan_hildebrandatworldvision.ca


Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 11:46:05 +0000

From: "Helene Delisle" <delislehatdsuper.net>

Subject: Re: Ngonut: Storage of breast milk samples

 

Dear Joan Hildebrand,

I have found 2 papers on the stability of blood vitamins during frozen storage, but nothing on breast milk, although some extrapolation may be legitimate. At -70C, no important decreases in retinol and carotenoids (or other vitamins) occurred in plasma after up to 42 months of storage (Comstock GW et al, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention 4 (5):505-7, 1995). At -20C, it was observed that retinol and carotenoids deteriorated substantially after 12 months, which appears to be the maximum frozen storage time for EDTA-plasma samples at that temperature (Ocke MC et al, J Clin Epidemiol 48(8): 1077-85, 1995).

 

Hélène Delisle, Dép. Nutrition

Université de Montréal, Qc Canada H3C 3J7

(514) 343-6406 FAX: (514) 343-7395


From: "Ghermai Berhe" <Ghermai_Berheatworldvision.ca>

Date: Wed, 9 Dec 1998 14:51:48 -0500

Subject: Breast milk storage

 

How long would vitamin A in breast milk be stable before storage in a -80

freezer? For example, if breast milk temporarily in a cold box or

refrigerator while being transported between field collection site and

long term -80 storage facilities. Appreciate any suggestion.

 

Ghermai Berhe

ghermai_berheatworldvision.ca